5 Ways to Get Out of the Guitarist's Sonic Space

Guitars and keyboards occupy the same sonic space in many worship sets, and it's important as a keyboardist to respect and work with the guitar player so that you don't clash sonically. Here are a few ways you can get your silence to mesh:

 

1. Play high, play low. 

 

Guitars are mostly a mid range instrument, which means you can quickly move out of their space by playing below C3 and above C6.

 

Experiment with voicing your chords more more simply in the higher registers, and play just a few sparse notes in the bass- you'll be amazed how much your parts stand out.

 

2. Trade-off.

 

When it comes to licks, it's always best to share. Try and get the guitar player and you to switch back-and-forth every other four measure repetition on who plays a lick, and you'll never get in each other's way sonically. This may take a little bit of diplomacy, but it's worth it if it means a better feel to the song.

 

3. Eye contact.

 

If you can visually communicate on stage, it's amazing how much more in sync you can be. Trying to position yourself on stage in a way that allows you to make eye contact without turning around.

 

4. Think layers.

 

Just like your mom told you when she was bundling you up to play in the snow, layers are key. If the guitar player, trying to duplicate it in a complementary way with a patch.

 

For instance, if he has a line that goes over the top of your pad sound, slightly tweak the pad to reflect what is playing. The key to this is been very subtle, and not stepping on the guitarist's part.

 

5. Practice listening.

 

most of us on stage are so worried about getting our parts right that we forget to listen. All of the above steps are great, but if you don't start listening carefully to what the musicians around you are doing, it's very hard to create something sonically pleasing on stage.

 

How do you work with your guitarist? Leave a comment below.